Yilan with Children: DIY Fun with Scallions / Spring Onions

Yilan is a great place to bring young children. Some of our memorable experiences include DIY fun with scallions, the Crayon Factory and the petting animal farms at Ah Mei and Bambi Land. In this post, I will share more about our experience with scallions and perhaps more on the others in subsequent posts.

Be sure to have a taste of scallions when in Yilan. The scallions in Sanxing Township of Yilan are famous because they are well cultivated due to the optimal weather, water and soil conditions. They are also known as the 三星葱 (Sanxing scallions), a synonym for tastiness and high quality.

Notice that I didn’t use spring onions but scallions? To many, ‘scallions’ is the synonym for ‘spring onions’. Many people including myself translate 蔥 to spring onions in English, but I found out that there’s a slight variation between scallions and spring onions. Spring onions have round bulbs but scallions are straight and thin.

Do check out the good food in Yilan while you are there! And if you are renting a car, find out some driving tips in Yilan. I would recommend you to read all my posts about Yilan and Taiwan as you plan for your trip!

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Planning Your Visit


We went to True Me Farm (初咪親子体験農場) for the scallion experience. They have packages from NT$150 to NT$250, and we bought the NT$200 (S$6.20) package for each person.

Each session takes about 60-90 minutes, depending on the crowd. We went early during off-peak season, so we were the only family doing the activities for the timeslot! We only took an hour from making the bread to plucking the scallions to the bread being ready to eat. Do buffer in more time at the end to hang around, eat the bread, and relax.

DIY Fun with Scallions
Getting ready to make scallion bread

Go early to avoid the crowd and hot afternoon sun! The first session starts at 9:10 AM and the next starts at every 50 minutes, with the last session at 4:40 PM.

I highly recommend buying the tickets from Klook because of the cancellation policy (please check the policy in case of changes). You’ll get a full refund as long as you don’t redeem your voucher. And if you are visiting other attractions in Yilan, purchase the Yilan pass from Klook to get more savings!

Klook.com

DIY Bread Making


Price chart and making of scallion breads

The staff demonstrated what we needed to do step-by-step before sending us to do it. We had to knead the flour, put the scallions into the dough, shape and paint the dough. I don’t prefer spring onions in Singapore, so I didn’t put in as many scallions as recommended by the staff. I regretted it! Their scallions made the bread so fragrant.

Not sure how you want to design the bread? No worries, the shop has a chart of different designs for you to choose from and copy. Can you make out who made what in the photo below? After we painted the dough, the staff helped us to bake them in the oven.

Bread we made

Scallion Pulling Experience


While the bread was baking in the oven, we were off to pluck some scallions! Before that, we had to dress up in rain boots and straw hats. Rows of rainboots of different sizes, from children to adults, were neatly displayed for us to choose from. Straw hats of various sizes were also provided and we each found an appropriate size to wear.

Our package allowed us to pull four strands of scallions under the hot scorching sun. There’s a technique to pull the scallions out – hold it near the roots and give a tug. My younger daughter needed a little help from the guide to pull it out from the ground.

The field is just a short walk from the main building. There were only a few rows of scallions. I was quite disappointed because I expected a more magnificent sight — rows and rows of scallions. Rather than an actual agriculture field, the place felt like a setup for tourists to pull scallions. Not sure if that’s the case, or it’s like the guide said, it’s not the scallions season when we were there in August.

After the field trip, we walked back to the building to wash up. Rinse the boots in the water first, and rinse the scallions next.

Washing Up after Pulling Scallions

Eat and Shop


After we were done with our “farming” experience, the bread was out of the oven and ready for us to eat. Like I said in my previous post, the bread was super yummy! The key is to eat it when piping hot. It was so good I wanted more. Thus, I bought the scallion pancake sold outside our lunch place even though we were having lunch soon. It was nice, but I think the ones we made were better. :)

There were many props and costumes for photo taking. So it’s a great place to chill, relax and have fun!

And before you leave, remember to shop for souvenirs! There are many products from food to stationery to buy home. The cashier recommended two bestsellers (biscuits) and they were delicious! We also bought the girls a scallion-looking pen each.

Our children had lots of fun and love to be back again. May you and your family have a similar fun experience! Remember to buy the tickets from Klook or the Yilan pass to get more savings!

Posing in the souvenir store
Klook.com

Before you go, you might want to check out my other posts on Taiwan. Leave your comments or questions below. Love to hear from you. :)

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